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ProduitsPartitions pour guitareGuitare et un autre instrumentFour Macedonian Pieces

Four Macedonian Pieces

Four Macedonian Pieces

Compositeur: TADIC Miroslav

DO 684

Avancé

ISBN: 978-2-89503-460-5

Guitare et flûte

25 p. + parties séparées
Les Éditions Doberman-Yppan

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Description

pour flûte alto et guitare

“Within these four pieces based on traditional Macedonian folk themes, Serbian guitarist/composer Miroslav Tadic has brought to fruition his fascination with the traditional music of this area, a former republic of Yugoslavia.
Contained in the four pieces are two folk songs and two dances. Zajdi, which opens the set is apparently based upon one of the most popular of Macedonian folk songs and is a poignant, evocative work in which the original words speak of the passing of time and imminent old age. In this piece, the guitarist is invited to make free variations and improvise upon a number of chord shapes given in the score.
By contrast, Pajdushka is an exciting fast dance in 5-time, divided as 2+3 throughout. This is followed by probably the most melodically attractive of the four: Jovka Kumanovka is a work based upon a song from the Kumanovo region of Macedonia and is reflective and melancholy and has the characteristic rhythm of 7/8 divided up as 3+2+2. Finally comes Gajdarsko Oro (Bagpiper’s Dance), a very energetic and festive work in which Tadic has included musical influences from Africa and Spain.
The set is well presented with clearly printed score and separate parts for both players. The technical difficulties are great and these four pieces are really only in the domain of the advanced duo. The whole set is dedicated to the Cavatina Duo (Denis Azabagic and Eugenia Moliner) who have recorded this work on their “Balkan Project” CD.”
Steve Marsh (Classical Guitar Magazine)

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